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equality will win


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how frustrated am i right now that blogger was not running all morning. every blogger in the world must be trying to post.

at the beginning of the morning i was just feeling a little disappointment. i was going to call today's postsometing snarky like 'poop' and chalk it up to impressionable simple minded americans who bought into bush's fear based campaign.

but reading that most people voted based on 'moral issues' was a slap in the face. bush did win out of fear, but not of terrorism, he won out of fear of gay people.

i'm deeply saddened, not just by the presidential outcome, but by the loss of so many gay rights in 11 states. it didn't really hit me until about 1:00. i feel the way i did when amendment 2 passed in colorado - like a second class citizen. i read andrew sullivan's post and it really got to me. especially this last part:

STAND TALL: But one more thing is important. The dignity of our lives and our relationships as gay people is not dependent on heterosexual approval or tolerance. Our dignity exists regardless of their fear. We have something invaluable in this struggle: the knowledge that we are in the right, that our loves are as deep and as powerful and as God-given as their loves, that our relationships truly are bonds of faith and hope that are worthy, in God's eyes and our own, of equal respect. Being gay is a blessing. The minute we let their fear and ignorance enter into our own souls, we lose. We have gained too much and come through too much to let ourselves be defined by others. We must turn hurt back into pride. Cheap, easy victories based on untruth and fear and cynicism are pyrrhic ones. In time, they will fall. So hold your heads up high. Do not give in to despair. Do not let the Republican party rob you of your hopes. This is America. Equality will win in the end.


6 responses to “equality will win”

  1. Anonymous Anonymous 

    It's not a fear of homosexuals. It's a belief that there is no need to treat homosexuals as some special class with special treatment. If two individuals of the same sex wish to be with one another, many do not have a problem with that. But re-defining a centuries old/timeless definition of marriage to cater to one group or another does not seem fair to those of us who have subscribed to the traditional view of marriage. As far as the argument of same sex partner benefits, etc., why should gays get special treatment? Common law couples and those of heterosexual tendency have for years lived together and still today do not qualify for dependent status unless a marriage takes place. It just doesn't make sense to many of us.

    Having said that, I have no malice or ill intent/thought toward gays. Most like me don't. I look forward to building "in roads" as a country together where we can learn to disagree agreeably. It doesn't make any of us good/bad to have differences of opinion.

  2. Blogger John 

    I totally agree anonymous. That's also why I support racial segregation of schools. Blacks should have the right to go to school, but why should they get special treatment to be bused and integrated to better white schools? Racial segrgation is a timeless centuries old trend and still ensure the equality of educational access to all citizens to attend a school. Racial integration doesn't make sense to many of us too.

    That's also why I support anti-miscegenation laws (i.e. not letting mixed race marriages). Blacks can marry, they just can't marry a different race. Whites suffer the same restriction. See, that's equality! No civilization supported mixed race marriages as a centuries old/timeless definition of marriage! And the whites who wish to marry blacks suffer the same status denial as others. Attempts to inter-racially marry also don't make a lot of sense to many of us.

    Oh wait. Maybe all three arguments are wrong. Maybe racial segregation and anti-gay laws are bad because equality doesn't mean a facially neutral law, maybe equality and freedom are more meaningful than that. Maybe it means giving the same opportunities to people if the source of the classification (race, sex, sexual orientation) is morally irrelevant. Maybe in order to be a just society and afford people equality, we need to ensure that through our laws.

    But what do I know, I actually opposed racial segregation unlike the majority of america in 1950 and the majority who voted for Bush yesterday.

  3. Blogger Luna Oliver 

    to joe: bush may have won his monkey-puppet position for another four years, but our integrity is still intact. things will change for the better. xo, s

    to anonymous "in roads": you say you have no fear of gay people, but from your post, you sound terrified. are you actually so insecure about your own definition of marriage that you think that extending this right would demolish what you may or may not have in your own life?

    for someone so against special treatment, you seem pretty comfortable to receive it. this issue is not about rewriting or redefining a freedom, it's about extending rights that already exist for "most like you."

    let's not forget that, at one time, that "traditional" view of marriage you subscribe to did not allow for a white person to marry a non-white. and hell, we all know that since they got rid of all those anti-miscegenation laws, marriage has certainly gone to shit.

  4. Anonymous Anonymous 

    Marriage crosses the boundaries of every race and every civilization. It is timeless in its definition. Segregation is not. It was and has been (like homosexuality) something that ebbs and flows, but has not been consistent across time.

    Racial segregation is wrong and always has been. Treating gays with disrespect is wrong and always will be.

    It seems obvious to me that some of you are not interested in hearing the views of someone who feel differently than you. I read this blog regularly and have no issues with it, including the post that I commented on. I simply added my opinion.

    I am at least attempting to read, understand and discuss in an agreeable/non-sarcastic manner the views of those who may feel differently than I do, but those that I still respect.

    I will rest with this post and hope I will not be hated for my difference of opinion.

  5. Blogger Bennydtown 

    Anonymous,

    I have a difficult time accepting the notion that some of the benefits instilled by marraige would be called "Special Rights". The ability to visit an incapacitated loved one in the hospital, or make medical decisions for them should not be a special right. The ability to provide health care for your partner should not be a special right. If I were to die unexpectedly, without a will, I would want my partner to inherit my estate.

    Many of the state ammendments that passed on Tuesday went beyond banning gay weddings, but included any equivelent form of Civil Union. They also extended the prohibition to include not recognising marraiges performed in other states or countries. That raises the exact same issues that complicated the anti-mysogination laws.

    The difference between gay partnerships and heterosexual common-law unions are that heterosexual couples have the choice to move on to the next step.

  6. Anonymous Anonymous 

    My term "special treatment" refers to the fact that I don't want marriage re-defined for all of society so that gays can find equality. I think gay couples can be given equality without re-defining marriage.

    It breaks my heart to know that gay couples don’t have the right to make decisions about one another in cases where medical issues arise, etc. I feel strongly that loved ones should be able to have the legal right to care for and direct the care for those partners whom they love and have been committed to.

    I don't think I'm on a different page from you in this regard. I believe that gay couples love no differently than hetero couples. When you grow to love someone as a close friend and then cement that relationship with the closeness that comes from love making, it drives two people together in a way that is almost indescribeable. I understand this for both gay & straight couples and respect both equally.

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